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Literatur zur Politischen Ökonomie
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Referenz:
Huffschmid (2005): Economic Policy for a Social Europe
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Titel:
Economic Policy for a Social Europe
Untertitel:
A Critique of Neo-liberalism and Proposals for Alternatives
Ort: Verl.:
Jahr:
2005
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Deskribierung:
Inhalt:
1 Introduction: the European Social Model: a Contested Concept 1

Part I Critique of Economic Policies in Europe 9

2 European Integration (1974–2004): towards a Neo-liberal Zone 11
2.1 Introduction 11
2.2 From an inward-looking process … rejecting the conflicts of the past 11
2.3 To an outward-looking union … confronted with a globalizing world 14
2.4 The main institutional steps in the integration process 21
2.5 Conclusion: for ever a neo-liberal zone? 25

3 Macroeconomic Policies: a Self-defeating Regime 27
3.1 Introduction 27
3.2 The road to monetary union 27
3.3 Fiscal policies 33
3.4 Monetary policy 35
3.5 New forms and problems of adjustment 37
3.6 Conclusions 39

4 The Drive for Financial Integration: Stability and Inclusion at Risk 41
4.1 Introduction 41
4.2 Tendencies in the EU financial services sector 42
4.3 Financial market integration policy in the EU 47
4.4 Assessing the EU financial market integration policy 51
4.5 Conclusion 57

5 The Attack on the Public Sector 59
5.1 Introduction: no mandate for privatization 59
5.2 Economic integration without a clear concept of the public sector 60
5.3 Network services: from liberalization to privatization 61
5.4 Services of general interest as niches in a world of competition – the position of the EU in the new debate 65
5.5 Conclusion 68

6 The ′Modernization′ of Social Policy: a Critique of Pension Reforms 70
6.1 Introduction 70
6.2 Social policy in the frame of globalization and neo-liberal policy 70
6.3 Social policy in the EU 71
6.4 The pension issue: the modernization of the pension systems 72
6.5 The real reasons for the reform 78
6.6 Conclusion 80

7 Employment through Labour Market Flexibility? A Critical Appraisal of the European Employment Strategy 82
7.1 Introduction 82
7.2 Flexibility versus innovation 82
7.3 Labour market policies in the EU 89
7.4 Conclusion 93

8 Europe′s Environment in Bad Shape 95
8.1 Introduction 95
8.2 Survival, inefficiency and lifestyle pressures on the environment 96
8.3 The precautionary principle and other guidelines of European environmental policy 96
8.4 The environmental implications of EU enlargement 99
8.5 Conflicts on energy security, collapsing climate, fading biodiversity 100
8.6 Conclusion 110

9 Structural Policies: Weak and Market Biased 113
9.1 Introduction: from the Treaty of Rome to the Single Market 113
9.2 The insufficiency of innovation and industrial policies 115
9.3 The limited efficiency of the regional policies and their planned reduction 121
9.4 Conclusion 125

10 Agricultural Policy: the Need for Reform 128
10.1 Introduction 128
10.2 The foundations of agricultural policies 128
10.3 Reform proposals 132
10.4 Conclusion 135

11 European Trade Policy: Weak and Too Liberal 137
11.1 Introduction: from the Treaty of Rome to the WTO 137
11.2 Strategic trade policy and North–North relations 140
11.3 Trade policy towards Southern countries 141
11.4 Sectoral problems 143
11.5 Conclusion 145

12 Enlargement: Not Enough Support for the New Members 147
12.1 Introduction 147
12.2 Main economic indicators of CEEC development 147
12.3 Imposing neo-liberal structures 153
12.4 Self-blockade by programmes and structures 157
12.5 The club approach to enlargement 158
12.6 Conclusion 160

13 Policy Coordination: Legitimate and Effective? 164
13.1 Introduction 164
13.2 What do we mean by policy coordination? The theoretical background 164
13.3 The complex system of EU policy coordination: the historical background 166
13.4 Critical issues in coordination practices 170
13.5 Coordination in urgent need of democratic reform 173
13.6 Conclusion 175

Part II Proposals for Alternatives 179

14 The European Social Model: Basis for a Strategy 181
14.1 Introduction 181
14.2 The European Social Model: re-embedding the economy into a context of democratization 181
14.3 The cornerstones 183
14.4 Conclusion 187

15 More Active Monetary and Exchange Rate Policies 189
15.1 Introduction 189
15.2 Monetary policy and the European Central Bank 189
15.3 European Monetary System Mark II 193
15.4 Exchange rate policy for the euro 195
15.5 Conclusions 197

16 Fiscal Policies: Stronger Coordination and Higher EU Budget 198
16.1 Introduction 198
16.2 Coordination of national fiscal policies 198
16.3 The budget of the EU 205
16.4 Which institutional structure for European fiscal and economic policy? 210
16.5 Conclusion 212

17 Labour Market Policies: Higher Standards 214
17.1 Introduction 214
17.2 The European Employment Strategy 216
17.3 For a genuine dialogue 219
17.4 European employment legislation 219
17.5 Conclusion 222

18 Taming European Finance: Stability, Efficiency and Inclusion 223
18.1 Introduction 223
18.2 Financial stability 223
18.3 Economic efficiency 227
18.4 Inclusion 229
18.5 Conclusion 233

19 A Strong and Democratic Public Sector 235
19.1 Introduction: dimensions of a new debate about public goods 235
19.2 A new balance between private and public consideration 236
19.3 European network services: proposals for improvement 237
19.4 Towards a broader European framework for public services 239
19.5 The financing of public services 242
19.6 Conclusion 243

20 A Secure Future for Pensions 244
20.1 Introduction 244
20.2 Some basic principles 244
20.3 Improving conditions of the present public systems 245
20.4 European convergence 250
20.5 Towards citizenship-based systems? 251
20.6 Financing of public pensions 252
20.7 Improvements of private systems 253
20.8 Conclusion 257

21 Pathways to a Sustainable Europe 259
21.1 Introduction 259
21.2 Lessons to be learned from a neglect of the precautionary principle 261
21.3 Modes of political regulation of the societal relation of humankind to nature 264
21.4 The transition to a renewable energy regime 267
21.5 Conclusion: the window of opportunities is open now 270

22 Structural Policies: Wider and More Ambitious 272
22.1 Introduction 272
22.2 A more comprehensive innovation and industrial policy 272
22.3 A continued regional policy in the context of eastern enlargement 277
22.4 Conclusion: a coherent programme for European structural policies 281

23 Common Agricultural Policy: a New Governance Regime 282
23.1 Introduction 282
23.2 A guaranteed prices system with individual quotas 282
23.3 Improve the rural development policy 284
23.4 Conclusion 286

24 Trade Policy: towards a New Concept of Fairness 288
24.1 Introduction 288
24.2 New orientations for the WTO 288
24.3 Renegotiating the GATS 292
24.4 Conclusion 292

25 How to Get from Here to There? 294
25.1 Introduction: political hegemony amidst economic weakness? 294
25.2 Emerging realism in the face of stagnation 295
25.3 Multi-speed initiatives 297
25.4 Social and political movements 299
25.5 Conclusion 301


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